THREE POPULAR INTERIOR TRIM STYLES IN ARIZONA CUSTOM HOMES!

Classic White Trim, Stain Grade Trim, or No Trim at All!

http://www.woodridgecustombuilders.com

As custom home builders in Arizona, our customers must make a large number of selections during the home construction process.  One such selection includes interior doors, door trim, baseboards, and door hardware. When making these selections there are many choices.  These choices include paint grade doors, or stain grade doors in a variety of woods and door styles.  Door hardware selected usually follows the style of the door and the style of the home whether it is traditional ranch, Spanish Colonial, or Tuscan.  With good selections, each complements the other when all of the features come together. Our customers usually make one of three choices for interior doors and trim; these include white doors and white trim, stain grade doors and trim, or stain grade doors without any trim.

 1)      Traditional White Doors and Trim:  When selecting interior doors, our customers will visit our supplier’s showroom to see first hand the variety of doors and styles to choose from.  First, our customers are asked if the interior doors are intended as paint grade or stain grade.  Paint grade doors are usually less expensive than wood doors intended for stain.  If paint grade doors are selected they will typically be finished in white paint along with door trim and large white baseboards. When our customers choose white doors and trim, we have often included white crown molding details or friezes in formal rooms of the home. White trim baseboards, interior doors and crown moldings are always classic, offering the feel and look of a very traditional American home and fit well in Arizona custom homes.  

2)      Stain Grade Doors and Trim:  Another popular option for interior doors are stained grade wood doors and trim.  These doors complement many home styles from traditional to Spanish Colonial.  Our customers have recently been selecting solid alder wood doors and have the doors and trim finished in darker wood stains that match the style of the home.  Baseboards are typically stained the same color.  In many of the Tuscan style homes we construct, wood beams in ceiling features are also stained to match.

3)      Stain Grade Doors without Trim:  Becoming very popular in Arizona are kerfed joints.  This is where wall edges  and corners are finished with a rounded drywall edge.  Because the joints at the door jams are finished and rounded with a smooth drywall edge as well, door trim is no longer necessary.  Many of our customers have selected this option in the past few years for several reasons.  One reason is because the door jams selected are usually paint grade allowing the door as the only stained feature, highlighting the door itself as a beautiful piece of work and the door doesn’t get lost in a stained frame.  Another reason our customers make this selection is that they can also skip the stain grade baseboards as well.  This further emphasizes the beauty of the wood doors throughout the house.  This is a perfect style for the ‘old-world’ look of a white Spanish Colonial with fully arched wood stained doors, black hardware and terra cotta tiled floors. 

Photos below highlight the various styles of these doors, trim and hardware, each complementing the home’s design and style of the homeowners.  Of course there are many combinations of these trim choices, white doors with or without trim, stained doors with or without trim in dozens of different combinations of door styles and stain colors.

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One response to “THREE POPULAR INTERIOR TRIM STYLES IN ARIZONA CUSTOM HOMES!

  1. Always nice to see anothers opnion.

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